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The rich and often tragic history of Black and Latino Americans has long been ignored.
In Black Chronicle and La Cronica historians and educators use a newspaper format to tell of their contributions and struggles.

- 1857, Issue 4 -

ABOUT BLACK CHRONICLE

BLACK CHRONICLE IS African American history in a newspaper format. It was developed by educators and historians to tell the thrilling story of African Americans from the American Revolution through the Civil Rights era.

Fourteen four-page issues (one set) illuminate historical periods that were profoundly important in the black experience. These include the American Revolution, the growth of King Cotton and the institution of slavery, the Nat Turner insurrection, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the roots of segregation in Plessy v. Ferguson, early 20th Century resistance in the Niagara Movement and the NAACP, the Harlem Renaissance, the Depression, World War II (WWII), and the tragedies and triumphs of the Civil Rights Movement.

The BLACK CHRONICLE tells its story through the eyes of African Americans, following the design styles of the eras covered, as if the events were happening today. In creating the project, extensive research was conducted in the New York Public Library’s Arthur C. Schomburg Collection, Harvard University’s Widener Library, the Boston Public Library, many private collections, and in rare editions of early black newspapers.

In each issue, a major event of the period is presented as the lead news story. Surrounding this are features, advertisements, human interest stories, editorials and political cartoons. Always fascinating, often tragic, sometimes humorous, these elements are combined to present a total and multi-faced moment in history.

The BLACK CRONICLE was originated and produced by Robert A. Miller in association with BLACKSIDE, INC.
 

- 1848, Issue 2 -

ABOUT LA CRONICA

LA CRONICA IS a bilingual newspaper presentation of Mexican American history. It was developed by historians and educators to tell the story of Mexican Americans from 1835, when California, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona were part of northern Mexico to the Chicano Civil Rights movements of the 1960s.

In nine eight-page issues (one set), LA CRONICA illuminates historical periods that were vital in the history and growth of Mexican American communities. LA CRONICA tells its story through the eyes of Mexican Americans, following the design styles of the eras covered, as if the events were happening today.

The information in LA CRONICA has been developed out of extensive research at institutions including the University of California, Berkeley and the Bancroft Collection; the Huntington Museum; the University of Texas, Austin; the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; the Denver Public Library; the University of Arizona, Tucson; and many historical societies and private collections, including rare editions of historical Mexican and Mexican American newspapers.

Each issue of LA CRONICA is dated at a critical point in Mexican American history. In each issue a major event of the period is presented as the lead news story. Surrounding this are features, advertisements, human interest stories, editorials and political cartoons. Always fascinating, often tragic, sometimes humorous, these elements are combined to present a total and multi-faceted moment in history. 

LA CRONICA was developed by the Center for the Study of Innovative Education, Inc. It can be used as core and supplemental social studies curricula in grades 6-12, and also supplements course materials in colleges and universities.